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Crop Production Field Day: September 15, 2016

SEPTEMBER 15th Field Day Opportunity
Clarks Grove, MN. Brad Carlson, U of M Extension will be discussing how environment and management practices can influence in-season soil nitrate dynamics. Lisa Behnken, U of M Extension, will be giving a herbicide resistant weed update with a focus on recent developments with waterhemp. David Nicolai, U of M Extension, will cover what we know about the newest herbicide technologies likely to come to market. Ryan Miller, U of M Extension, will give a 2016 crop season review and outlook, and will update you on the variable rate nitrogen trial being conducted in Southern, MN. David Bau, U of M Extension, will address the current economic downturn with an outlook on land rents, land value and corn and soybean production costs.

For Details Click Here!
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Opportunity to Tour Weed Management Trials in Rochester

July 22, 2016

Fritz and I invite you to come and see the weed management / herbicide trials at our Rochester Field location. Since our rainy, July 7 Field Day, a number of groups (large and small) have toured the trials with us. Of keen interest are management strategies to control waterhemp and giant ragweed in soybeans, especially with herbicide resistant issues growing. ​There are also demonstrations showing the value of using preemergence herbicides in soybeans. For example - how many days can a robust preemergence (PRE) program give you before the postemergence (POST) program needs to be applied? We also have four corn weed management trials that include new herbicide combinations such as Acuron, Acuron Flexi, Resicore, and Diflexx Duo. We show many herbicide programs, but like to discuss what non-chemical ideas have you implemented on your farm?

You are welcome to tour the plots on your own (plots are signed) or if we are available, Fritz and I will take your group through…

Plan to attend the 2016 Crop Management Tour

Fast Forward on Frost Recovery

Abnormally cold temperatures and frost on 5/14/16 and 5/15/16 caused significant injury to many corn fields in Southeastern Minnesota.  Corn injury was influenced by planting date, with most severe injury on planting dates around April 19th. 

Corn planted around April 19th, sustained serious damage and has had the most difficult recovery.  My infield observations on May 23rd were that stands had not been reduced by much, if at all, by the frost. That said, the crop came back unevenly and upwards of 20,000 of plants per acre were buggy-whipped or tied up as of Monday May 23rd (stand counts remain at 34,000 to 35,000).


Fast Forward to June 8th, stands remain strong and plants have grown through the buggy whipping but growth remains uneven across the areas most severely affected by frost:

We will see if things even out over the next few weeks.
 Ryan Miller

Recovering from Cold Temperatures and Frost

Abnormally cold temperatures and frost created significant injury in most corn and some soybeans.  Many soybeans were planted late enough that they had yet to emerge by the time of the cold temperatures and frost on 5/14/16 and 5/15/16.  By and large soybeans were spared from the frost, that said, several thousand acres of early planted soybeans will be replanted in Southeastern Minnesota.

Corn injury and recovery appears to be influenced by planting date.  Reports from the earliest planted corn (4-10-16 to 4-12-16) are that injury was not too significant and that they have recovered well.  I have not validated these claims with any of my own observations.

The second corn planting date, around April 19th, sustained serious damage and has had the most difficult recovery.  My infield observations are that stands have not been reduced by much, if at all, by the frost. That said, the crop has come back unevenly and upwards of 20,000 of plants per acre remain buggy-whipped or tied up as of …